Wednesday, April 27, 2016

How to use the word Comprise


Comprise

Try to picture the word comprise as a net cast over items or as a giant umbrella protecting individuals from the rain.

 


 

 


It's the big thing that covers individual things.

 
Correct: A zoo comprises lions, tigers, and elephants.

Incorrect: Lions, tigers, and elephants comprise a zoo.

Maybe you'd be more comfortable using the phrase consists of. You can put that at the beginning of the sentence.

Correct: A zoo consists of lions, tigers, and elephants.

Or if you’re still wanting something at the end of the sentence, use constitutes.

Correct: Lions, tigers, and elephants constitute a zoo.

 
Summary:

Incorrect: A zoo is comprised of lions, tigers, and elephants.

Correct: A zoo consists of lions, tigers, and elephants.

Correct: A zoo comprises lions, tigers, and elephants.

Correct: Lions, tigers, and elephants constitute a zoo.

I suspect that people are thinking of “consists of” but use “comprised of,” which is incorrect.

 

 

 

No comments:

Post a Comment